taCity

A site about the ephemerality of the socio-urban world

Geography isn’t dead. It’s the future…

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For a time, it was fashionable to talk of the ‘end of geography‘. In the brave new financial and globalising world of the late 90s, the world wide web and telecommunications were going to obliterate borders and usher in a new ‘global village’. We all know how that turned out.

9/11, religious terrorism, the financial crash, Brexit and Trump have all shown how the imaginary of the nation-state is still a fundamental part of our existence on this planet. Borders, cultures, economics, violence, empire, society and the climate catastrophe that encompasses all of these; they all have a geographical root.

So today, geography is more important than ever. The term ‘geography’ originates from two greek words: the first is ‘geo’ which means ‘the earth’ and the second “graph” which means  ‘to write‘) – to write the Earth. It is concerned with the relationship people have with the places around them, and how together, we create the spaces of the world that we all inhabit.

So studying and tackling climate change and the Anthropocene (or what some people have called the Capitaloscene); understanding the rise of a populist fascism in the heartlands of the liberal democratic nations of the West; realising the massive effects of social media and machine learning on the workings of the human psyche and how we relate to each other to create societies; building the cities that will house the rapidly expanding and mass-migrating populations of the climate-change-ravaged Global South; having a geographical understanding of the world is not only critical now, but it will arguably be the foundation of the future.

Here at the Geography Department at Royal Holloway, University of London, we have devised a brand new MSc in Global Futures (and two related MRes courses) that does just that: equips the learners on the course to have an in-depth, critical and geographical awareness of the world around them, and how that knowledge can help tackle the challenges everyone will face in the future.

The department has extensive expertise in cultural & creative geographies, historical geography, geopolitics & security, development & sustainability and social justice. Study sites range from rampant inequality of London as a global city, the slave labour of the Cambodian construction industry, the geopolitics of the oceans, the artistic and creative approaches to subterranean spaces, the climate-change induced wildfires in Australia, the Amazon and California, and many others that demonstrate a cutting-edge application of human geography to the major global challenges of our world. Blended together, these themes and sites create a course that will provide critical geographical knowledge, advanced research skills as well as prized employability skills via in-work leaning.

So if you’re looking to have a meaningful impact upon the world, then get in touch. As the course director I handle all the applications – email me if you’re interested in applying, or click on the various links in this post to find out more information.

As an academic discipline, geography helps us to better understand climate change and the impact that is having upon all the other issues that we see in the world today. It is far from dead…

Author: Oli

Human Geographer at Royal Holloway, University of London

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